Hiking a Volcano, Rangitoto, Auckland

Hiking a Volcano Rangitoto Auckland

Hiking a Volcano Rangitoto Auckland

Rangitoto is the youngest volcano of the 50 volcano’s in Auckland, It last erupted 600 years ago.  Situated in the Hauraki Gulf it is one of the most photographed icons in Auckland.

How to Get There – There are regular ferries from Downtown Auckland with Fullers Cruises.

What to Take It’s advisable to take a packed lunch and plenty of water. The heat radiates from the volcanic rock. Wear sturdy walking shoes or boots.

The walk takes about three hours,  hike in the morning, have lunch at the summit and walk back down in the afternoon to catch the ferry back to Auckland.

Hiking a Volcano Rangitoto Auckland

The Crator – Rangitoto Island Auckland

Hiking a Volcano – I did this hike a few year’s ago, although it’s not a very scenic walk the views from the top looking over the Hauraki Gulf are amazing.  I couldn’t believe how big the crater was and I was expecting a big gaping hole it is covered in dense bush.  There is also a track that circles the rim.

Hiking a Volcano Rangitoto Auckland

Original NZ Iconic Bach (Beach House)

The bach (bach is the name for New Zealand holiday homes) communities on Rangitoto Island built in the 1920’s and 1930’s, and consist of private holiday homes and boatsheds.

Māori myths

There are several Māori myths associated with Rangitoto. One tells of the children of the fire deities, who lived in the Auckland area.

One night a husband and wife argued and cursed the fire deity Mahuika. She complained to Mataoho, the deity of earthquakes and eruptions, who sent an eruption to destroy the couple’s mountain home. It was swallowed up by the earth and became Lake Pupuke on Auckland’s North Shore, and Rangitoto rose out of the sea. When mist surrounds Rangitoto, it is the tears of the couple as they weep over their lost home.

 

 

 


Things To Do In Auckland, New Zealand

Auckland New Zealand

My Picks on ‘Things to do in Auckland’

For culture and history you may wish to visit the Auckland Museum where there is an excellent Maori concert/cultural performance.

Visit the New Zealand Maritime Museum my favourite part of this museum is the 1950’s vintage NZ beach house (Bach).  There is also activities for children and daily sailings on a historic vessel ‘Breeze’.

Climb Auckland Harbour Bridge or Jump off the world’s first harbour bridge bungy with Auckland Bridge Bungy

Hike Rangitoto Volcano in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf, a regular ferry service with Fuller’s.

Rangitoto Volcano, Hauraki Gulf, Auckland

Rangitoto Volcano, Hauraki Gulf, Auckland

Explore Auckland’s West Coast Beaches, Lush Rain Forest or join a Vineyard Tour with Bush and Beach

Piha West Coast Black Sand Beach

Piha West Coast Black Sand Beach. Source www.flickr/chrisgin/

Auckland Hop on, Hop Off Explorer – There are two different bus routes where you can combine them in one day. The bus stops at fourteen attractions with full commentary and departs every 30 minutes.

Spend a day on Waiheke Island, only 35mins by ferry from downtown Auckland.  Waiheke is popular for its stunning beach’s, vineyards & wineries, art scene and watersports.

Mudbrick Restaurant & Vineyard Waiheke Island

Mudbrick Restaurant & Vineyard, Waiheke Island

Background
Auckland City the largest city in New Zealand with a population of 1.4 million people.  Auckland’s nickname ‘City of Sails’ as one in three Auckland households own a boat.  Much of Auckland is built on the Auckland Volcanic Field and has 50 volcanoes. The last volcano to erupt was Rangitoto Island 600 years ago.

 

Travel Notes & Beyond


Sleeping in a Samoan Fale

Lauiula Beach Fales, Lano Beach

FALE

lanoA Samoan Beach Fale is a simple hut with a thatched roof . The banana leaf blinds can be rolled up in the day to let the ocean breeze flow through.falesMy three sons and I stayed at Lauiula Beach Fales.  I had a wooden fale that had a locked door, a small patio and fridge.  The boys had a traditional woven fale.  Lano Beach has golden sand and was good for  snorkeling  at low tide. The coral was only a few metres from the beach and there was a range of colored fish. Son No.2 swam out to the outer reef, he found plastic bags wrapped around the coral so he did a bit of a clean up being a greenie!

Afu Aau Blow Holessamoan manAfu Aau Blowholes You watch the waves roll in, then hear the roar as the huge streams of water shoot up, through the tunnels in the lave.  A local man throws a bunch of coconuts over the blow holes, you watch them rocket into the air.

blowholes

Alafaaga Waterfalls  We stopped at this waterfall on the way back to the fales.  The boys took a dip, I didn’t as there were nowhere to change.waterfall

Lano Beach Samoa


Tropical Paradise Le Vasa Savaii Samoa

Le Vasa
After several months browsing through Trip Advisor, looking at Pacific Islands for a holiday with my three sons, I decided on Samoa. Which island to visit Upolu or Savaii? Upolu suffered from a tsunami in 2009 and because of this the coral was badly damaged and we were keen to do some snorkeling. Savaii wasn’t badly affected by the tsunami. So Savaii it was!

Our aeroplane was late leaving so we missed the last ferry crossing from Upolu to Savaii.  Standing outside the airport a taxi driver was helpful and phoned some accommodation close by.  We could only get in contact with Le Vasa which I knew was expensive through all my research on Trip Advisor – but I thought ‘What The Hell’.

Arrived at the resort ten minutes later and drove through a beautiful garden of Palm Tree’s and Tropical Plants. This was my idea of a Tropical Paradise. Our accommodation was a Samoan style bungalow with a lovely deck on the water’s edge.  Resort had an open restaurant and bar overlooking a large swimming pool. 

The resorts reception area and bedroom had an eclectic theme decorated with antiques and tropical style furniture.

Le Vasafull_img_1202_1431934536Le Vasafull_img_1198_1431934558Le Vasa4full_ocean-view-dining--_1433406691full_sunset-oceanfront-villa_1433241087full_image-46_1433241022

Travel Notes & Beyond